Category Archives: Inisheer Zibaldone

Inis Oírr’s Fountain

A woman I know told me a man from Galway she knows told her that the cargo of the Plassey, which was shipwrecked on Inis Oírr in the 1960’s, included ceramic toilet bowls. Many of these were spirited away when the Plassey was grounded on Trá Caorach. A woman I know told me a man from Galway she knows told her that some of the ceramic toilet bowls were used in the dwellings on the island, while others were sold in Galway. We imagine Duchampian porcelain installation pieces might still be found unclaimed in the caves and crevices of the limestone.

Bliain in Inis Oírr, Episode 4

Inis Oírr lies 6 miles off the coast of Connemara. With over 250 inhabitants it is the smallest of the three Aran Islands. While embracing progress and change, this rocky outpost has managed to retain much of its traditional island way of life. Inhabited by communities whose everyday language is Irish, the Aran Islands are immediately striking for being a desert of rock where there is scarcely any shelter, no mountains or woodland to be found. What pasture there is has been largely man made. James Joyce once wrote that these islands could be the place to go to find the real Ireland — something that has particular resonance today. Filmed from January to December 2010, “Bliain In Inis Oírr” is a four part series that follows a diverse mix of individuals living on the island. From new-comers to those who have lived there for generations, audiences will be given an insight to day-to-day island life and the reasons why each of these people has chosen to make this magical, yet harsh, place their home. Each of the four episodes features one particular season, highlighting seasonal activities and festivals as well as the passage of time through the changing weather and vegetation of the island.

Bliain in Inis Oírr, Episode 3

Inis Oírr lies 6 miles off the coast of Connemara. With over 250 inhabitants it is the smallest of the three Aran Islands. While embracing progress and change, this rocky outpost has managed to retain much of its traditional island way of life. Inhabited by communities whose everyday language is Irish, the Aran Islands are immediately striking for being a desert of rock where there is scarcely any shelter, no mountains or woodland to be found. What pasture there is has been largely man made. James Joyce once wrote that these islands could be the place to go to find the real Ireland — something that has particular resonance today. Filmed from January to December 2010, “Bliain In Inis Oírr” is a four part series that follows a diverse mix of individuals living on the island. From new-comers to those who have lived there for generations, audiences will be given an insight to day-to-day island life and the reasons why each of these people has chosen to make this magical, yet harsh, place their home. Each of the four episodes features one particular season, highlighting seasonal activities and festivals as well as the passage of time through the changing weather and vegetation of the island.

Bliain in Inis Oírr, Episode 2

Inis Oírr lies 6 miles off the coast of Connemara. With over 250 inhabitants it is the smallest of the three Aran Islands. While embracing progress and change, this rocky outpost has managed to retain much of its traditional island way of life. Inhabited by communities whose everyday language is Irish, the Aran Islands are immediately striking for being a desert of rock where there is scarcely any shelter, no mountains or woodland to be found. What pasture there is has been largely man made. James Joyce once wrote that these islands could be the place to go to find the real Ireland — something that has particular resonance today. Filmed from January to December 2010, “Bliain In Inis Oírr” is a four part series that follows a diverse mix of individuals living on the island. From new-comers to those who have lived there for generations, audiences will be given an insight to day-to-day island life and the reasons why each of these people has chosen to make this magical, yet harsh, place their home. Each of the four episodes features one particular season, highlighting seasonal activities and festivals as well as the passage of time through the changing weather and vegetation of the island.

 

Bliain in Inis Oírr, Episode 1

Inis Oírr lies 6 miles off the coast of Connemara. With over 250 inhabitants it is the smallest of the three Aran Islands. While embracing progress and change, this rocky outpost has managed to retain much of its traditional island way of life. Inhabited by communities whose everyday language is Irish, the Aran Islands are immediately striking for being a desert of rock where there is scarcely any shelter, no mountains or woodland to be found. What pasture there is has been largely man made. James Joyce once wrote that these islands could be the place to go to find the real Ireland — something that has particular resonance today. Filmed from January to December 2010, “Bliain In Inis Oírr” is a four part series that follows a diverse mix of individuals living on the island. From new-comers to those who have lived there for generations, audiences will be given an insight to day-to-day island life and the reasons why each of these people has chosen to make this magical, yet harsh, place their home. Each of the four episodes features one particular season, highlighting seasonal activities and festivals as well as the passage of time through the changing weather and vegetation of the island.

Radharc: Inisheer

The 1971 Radharc documentary about life on Inis Oírr.

“Adults, who have never attended secondary school, feel they have nothing to offer the young. This is not true. You have a knowledge that no school can provide – the education of life’s experiences here on the island. That is the real  education – education that comes from the heart. You give that education through being with them and through the normal chores of the day. This education of experience is passed on unknown – just as important as schooling. I believe, it is important that those attending secondary school be treated as if always at home. They need to know that the family given experience is better than any other.”

Aerial / Sparks

Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture presents AERIAL/SPARKS by Louise Manifold in partnership with the Marine Institute Ireland and in association with the Commissioners of Irish Lights; Áras Éanna, Inis Oírr; and Ars Electronica 2020. Supported through Arts Council of Ireland Project Awards 2017 and 2019.

11 – 28 September, Inis Oírr

Aerial/Sparks, created by Irish artist Louise Manifold for Galway’s European Capital of Culture 2020, invites you to connect in person and online with one of the last unknown spaces on earth, the ocean wilderness. Seven artists, writers and composers from across Europe have produced a series of compelling standalone artworks for exhibition and radio broadcast, inspired by their experiences of joining research expeditions on board the Marine Institute Ireland’s RV Celtic Explorer.

Participating artists: Ailís Ní Ríain (IRL), Carol Anne Connolly (IRL), David Stalling (DE), Kennedy Browne (IRL), Kevin Barry (IRL), Magz Hall (EN) and Robertina Šebjanič (SI).

The rugged beauty of Inis Oírr, the smallest of the Aran Islands, is the setting for Aerial/Sparks. Positioned between the relative calmness of Galway Bay and the wildness of the Atlantic, and immersed in maritime culture, Inis Oírr is the ideal host location. At just 3km long by 3km wide, visitors can easily traverse the island by foot to discover sound works housed across the island.

A dedicated virtual programme of events for Ars Electronica 2020 (https://ars.electronica.art/keplersgardens/en/) the world-renowned festival for art, technology and society, will accompany the main programme from 9 – 11 September. Titled Garden GALWAY by Aerial/Sparks, events include a presentation of acoustic works and conversations between artists and marine scientists.

Aerial / Sparks has taken shape through a long-term collaboration with the Marine Institute, the national agency responsible for marine research, technology development and innovation in Ireland. Since 2017, artists from Ireland, Germany, England and Slovenia have taken part in 7 ocean surveys and a passage from Galway to Hamburg on the RV Celtic Explorer, one of the few marine research vessels with sonic capabilities.

The utopian potential of radio was evoked by the Russian Futurist poet Velimir Khlebnikov (1885-1922). The universal communicative power of the medium resonated with the ambitious social projects and artistic visions that sprouted across the globe in the wake of the First World War. Khlebnikov’s vision encompasses both the educational and aesthetic domains: radio is imagined as a medium both for the universal edification of mankind and for its musical delectation. Aerial/Sparks started its journey by exploring the potential of radio communication to reimagine our relationship with the ocean. Each artist’s experience of ocean and water masses around Ireland and Europe has informed the production of individual work for audio and radio listening.

http://www.aras-eanna.ie/event/aerial-sparks-galway-2020/